Elements of Hiring, Finding the Right Fit

The right person for the job can make all the difference to a business owner’s bottom line.

But cash value isn’t the only thing employees bring to the table. Talent, skills and an authentic investment in the firm’s goods or services and corporate philosophy are soft skills often difficult to discern in a 20-minute interview, or while scanning an online resume response.

With over 70,000 job boards in the United States alone, finding the perfect job to worker match remains a challenge for most employers.

In the digital era of social media, hiring boards, Monster.com, the sheer volume of places a job seeker can look for work is often overwhelming, according to Jennifer Schultz, owner of Recruitment Queen based in Warminster.

“Advertising platforms have created too many sources,” Schultz explained.

Finding the magic blend of skills, character assets and drive still requires purposeful planning, advertising in the right places and interviewing to find the best candidate, Schultz said.

Narrowing the field to find more qualified candidates means targeting the search for workers and keeping an active pool of candidates at the ready.

Knowing where to look is half the battle. “Job seekers are so frustrated with the process, they pull out,” Schultz said.

Ask current employees for staffing recommendations, look to professional organizations or networking groups, connect with local chambers of commerce and pinpoint where best to find people from among the multitudes.

Reaching a target market might limit the amount of people but it increases the amount of qualified candidates, Schultz advised.

Some are desperate for jobs and will apply to most anything, even jobs for which they don’t qualify, Schultz said.

Targeted advertising and active recruiting- even when there are no current job openings – are in an employer’s best interests, according to Schultz.

So is transparency and making job postings easy to find.

Don’t hide the job postings, Schultz cautioned. “Often company websites hide their job postings, making them difficult to find,” Schultz said.

Capitalize on making available jobs easy to see on a website, and go the extra step. Promote work/life or flexible job options. “Who offers the most job security, who is the best company for those over 55, or for Veterans,” Schultz said.

Promoting your company’s assets and work environment to prospective employees, the way you would to customers or clients, is a perspective shift that could yield big results.

Shultz’s Tips:
1) Be thoughtful about where you recruit, target your search.

2) Brand your company. What can you offer as an employer to attract and retain talent?

3) Tell your story. Think like a job seeker, and be convincing.

4) Have an open mind: Look beyond body art and tattoos. For a potential candidate with body art, can it be covered up during the work day? Can piercings be removed? Tattoos are so widespread, they shouldn’t be a deal breaker for a qualified job candidate,” Schultz said.

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